University of David

Come for the pictures; stay for the ideas!!
beautifuldreamtrips:

Old stone bridge of Palaiokaria by ntinoslagos on 500pxhttp://ift.tt/1kNzUZ2

beautifuldreamtrips:

Old stone bridge of Palaiokaria by ntinoslagos on 500px
http://ift.tt/1kNzUZ2

(via greeklife4ever)

http://www.amazon.com/Road-Reality-Complete-Guide-Universe/dp/0679776311/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406717465&sr=1-1&keywords=penrose+road+to+reality&dpPl=1
Roger Penrose, one of the most accomplished scientists of our time, presents the only comprehensive and comprehensible account of the physics of the universe. From the very first attempts by the Greeks to grapple with the complexities of our known world to the latest application of infinity in physics, The Road to Reality carefully explores the movement of the smallest atomic particles and reaches into the vastness of intergalactic space. Here, Penrose examines the mathematical foundations of the physical universe, exposing the underlying beauty of physics and giving us one the most important works in modern science writing.
Amazon.com Review

 If Albert Einstein were alive, he would have a copy of The Road to Reality on his bookshelf. So would Isaac Newton. This may be the most complete mathematical explanation of the universe yet published, and Roger Penrose richly deserves the accolades he will receive for it. That said, let us be perfectly clear: this is not an easy book to read. The number of people in the world who can understand everything in it could probably take a taxi together to Penrose’s next lecture. Still, math-friendly readers looking for a substantial and possibly even thrillingly difficult intellectual experience should pick up a copy (carefully—it’s over a thousand pages long and weighs nearly 4 pounds) and start at the beginning, where Penrose sets out his purpose: to describe “the search for the underlying principles that govern the behavior of our universe.” Beginning with the deceptively simple geometry of Pythagoras and the Greeks, Penrose guides readers through the fundamentals—the incontrovertible bricks that hold up the fanciful mathematical structures of later chapters. From such theoretical delights as complex-number calculus, Riemann surfaces, and Clifford bundles, the tour takes us quickly on to the nature of spacetime. The bulk of the book is then devoted to quantum physics, cosmological theories (including Penrose’s favored ideas about string theory and universal inflation), and what we know about how the universe is held together. For physicists, mathematicians, and advanced students, The Road to Reality is an essential field guide to the universe. For enthusiastic amateurs, the book is a project to tackle a bit at a time, one with unimaginable intellectual rewards. —Therese Littleton  



From Publishers Weekly
 At first, this hefty new tome from Oxford physicist Penrose (The Emperor’s NewMind) looks suspiciously like a textbook, complete with hundreds of diagrams and pages full of mathematical notation. On a closer reading, however, one discovers that the book is something entirely different and far more remarkable. Unlike a textbook, the purpose of which is purely to impart information, this volume is written to explore the beautiful and elegant connection between mathematics and the physical world. Penrose spends the first third of his book walking us through a seminar in high-level mathematics, but only so he can present modern physics on its own terms, without resorting to analogies or simplifications (as he explains in his preface, “in modern physics, one cannot avoid facing up to the subtleties of much sophisticated mathematics”). Those who work their way through these initial chapters will find themselves rewarded with a deep and sophisticated tour of the past and present of modern physics. Penrose transcends the constraints of the popular science genre with a unique combination of respect for the complexity of the material and respect for the abilities of his readers. This book sometimes begs comparison with Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time, and while Penrose’s vibrantly challenging volume deserves similar success, it will also likely lie unfinished on as many bookshelves as Hawking’s. For those hardy readers willing to invest their time and mental energies, however, there are few books more deserving of the effort. 390 illus. (Feb. 24)

http://www.amazon.com/Road-Reality-Complete-Guide-Universe/dp/0679776311/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406717465&sr=1-1&keywords=penrose+road+to+reality&dpPl=1

Roger Penrose, one of the most accomplished scientists of our time, presents the only comprehensive and comprehensible account of the physics of the universe. From the very first attempts by the Greeks to grapple with the complexities of our known world to the latest application of infinity in physics, The Road to Reality carefully explores the movement of the smallest atomic particles and reaches into the vastness of intergalactic space. Here, Penrose examines the mathematical foundations of the physical universe, exposing the underlying beauty of physics and giving us one the most important works in modern science writing.

Amazon.com Review

If Albert Einstein were alive, he would have a copy of The Road to Reality on his bookshelf. So would Isaac Newton. This may be the most complete mathematical explanation of the universe yet published, and Roger Penrose richly deserves the accolades he will receive for it. That said, let us be perfectly clear: this is not an easy book to read. The number of people in the world who can understand everything in it could probably take a taxi together to Penrose’s next lecture. Still, math-friendly readers looking for a substantial and possibly even thrillingly difficult intellectual experience should pick up a copy (carefully—it’s over a thousand pages long and weighs nearly 4 pounds) and start at the beginning, where Penrose sets out his purpose: to describe “the search for the underlying principles that govern the behavior of our universe.” Beginning with the deceptively simple geometry of Pythagoras and the Greeks, Penrose guides readers through the fundamentals—the incontrovertible bricks that hold up the fanciful mathematical structures of later chapters. From such theoretical delights as complex-number calculus, Riemann surfaces, and Clifford bundles, the tour takes us quickly on to the nature of spacetime. The bulk of the book is then devoted to quantum physics, cosmological theories (including Penrose’s favored ideas about string theory and universal inflation), and what we know about how the universe is held together. For physicists, mathematicians, and advanced students, The Road to Reality is an essential field guide to the universe. For enthusiastic amateurs, the book is a project to tackle a bit at a time, one with unimaginable intellectual rewards. —Therese Littleton 

From Publishers Weekly

At first, this hefty new tome from Oxford physicist Penrose (The Emperor’s NewMind) looks suspiciously like a textbook, complete with hundreds of diagrams and pages full of mathematical notation. On a closer reading, however, one discovers that the book is something entirely different and far more remarkable. Unlike a textbook, the purpose of which is purely to impart information, this volume is written to explore the beautiful and elegant connection between mathematics and the physical world. Penrose spends the first third of his book walking us through a seminar in high-level mathematics, but only so he can present modern physics on its own terms, without resorting to analogies or simplifications (as he explains in his preface, “in modern physics, one cannot avoid facing up to the subtleties of much sophisticated mathematics”). Those who work their way through these initial chapters will find themselves rewarded with a deep and sophisticated tour of the past and present of modern physics. Penrose transcends the constraints of the popular science genre with a unique combination of respect for the complexity of the material and respect for the abilities of his readers. This book sometimes begs comparison with Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History of Time, and while Penrose’s vibrantly challenging volume deserves similar success, it will also likely lie unfinished on as many bookshelves as Hawking’s. For those hardy readers willing to invest their time and mental energies, however, there are few books more deserving of the effort. 390 illus. (Feb. 24)

http://www.amazon.com/Feynman-Lectures-Physics-boxed-set/dp/0465023827/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406717371&sr=1-3&keywords=feynman&dpPl=1
"The whole thing was basically an experiment," Richard Feynman said late in his career, looking back on the origins of his lectures. The experiment turned out to be hugely successful, spawning a book that has remained a definitive introduction to physics for decades. Ranging from the most basic principles of Newtonian physics through such formidable theories as general relativity and quantum mechanics, Feynman’s lectures stand as a monument of clear exposition and deep insight. Now, we are reintroducing the printed books to the trade, fully corrected, for the first time ever, and in collaboration with Caltech. Timeless and collectible, the lectures are essential reading, not just for students of physics but for anyone seeking an introduction to the field from the inimitable Feynman.

http://www.amazon.com/Feynman-Lectures-Physics-boxed-set/dp/0465023827/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1406717371&sr=1-3&keywords=feynman&dpPl=1

"The whole thing was basically an experiment," Richard Feynman said late in his career, looking back on the origins of his lectures. The experiment turned out to be hugely successful, spawning a book that has remained a definitive introduction to physics for decades. Ranging from the most basic principles of Newtonian physics through such formidable theories as general relativity and quantum mechanics, Feynman’s lectures stand as a monument of clear exposition and deep insight. Now, we are reintroducing the printed books to the trade, fully corrected, for the first time ever, and in collaboration with Caltech. Timeless and collectible, the lectures are essential reading, not just for students of physics but for anyone seeking an introduction to the field from the inimitable Feynman.

Atomic discourse inThe Feynman Lectures on Physics, David A. Edwards

http://www.math.uga.edu/%7Edavide/Atomic_Discourse_in_the_Feynman_Lectures_on_Physics.pdf

We examine the compromises that are actually made in modern scientific discourse concerning atoms. We conclude that even the ideals of clarity and consistency can be legitimately compromised in order to obtain other advantages.

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de-preciated:

wiwaxy peaks (by calguru)

de-preciated:

wiwaxy peaks (by calguru)

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floralls:

Exploring the world. (by Carola Photography ∞)

floralls:

Exploring the world. (by Carola Photography ∞)

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antandros:

Beautiful Holland

antandros:

Beautiful Holland

etherealvistas:

Apron (Bosnia and Herzegovina) by Michał Sleczek

etherealvistas:

Apron (Bosnia and Herzegovina) by Michał Sleczek

(via illusionwanderer)

(Source: the-hungrygames)